Myths surrounding cloud-based solutions

There’s a whole bunch of myths surrounding cloud-based communication solutions that are mostly used to dissuade enterprises from implementing them. Lack of control over company sensitive data and problems that may occur when integrating cloud-based solutions with other more traditional applications are the two most common concerns.

Companies Lose Control Over Key Data.

This is one of the most common arguments in the effort against cloud-based services. You have zero control over your data, you are at the mercy of your cloud provider when it comes to even the most minute matters like day-to-day changes in configuration or access control.

This argument could not be further from the truth since one of the key advantages is the modular user interfaces developed by providers – those turn into multifunctional tools in the hands of a manager. When it comes to contact centres, the managers can implement vast changes without any involvement from the IT department while even closely monitoring their agents since the tools they are using are fitted to them specifically.

As for the loss of control over key data, every cloud-based system allows storing sensitive information on the client’s premises.

Difficult Integration.

The difficulty with integration is yet another myth that shrouds Cloud solutions. Most customer care centres today operate on-premise based systems that require cost-heavy CTI integration. Cloud, on the other hand, uses latest web services technology. It is designed with the phrase “user-friendly” in mind – making it easier to actually implement into a premise-based system, not to mention other cloud applications.

The Aftermath.

Cloud-based solutions are easily integrated and you don’t loose control over any data. So is this solution right for your enterprise? That is for you to decide.

Keep in mind that consumer demands are on the rise, mobile customer support access, social media integration and much more. Cloud could unify the whole field.

It does not solve all the problems but can solve most of them or in the very least point us to the logical solution.

 

BPO & The Cloud: A match Made in Heaven

It’s quite easy to notice the synergies between cloud computing and BPO.

Businesses around the globe acknowledge the benefits of cloud-based solutions and are aware of the competitive advantage those provide. Many enterprises are pushing for transitioning to a cloud-based environment.

This solution is mostly praised by small and mid-sized businesses as it provides a big cost reduction since there is no need to maintain complex in-house systems that require frequent upgrades and support.

This new level of flexibility a cloud-based environment provides is not only faster but more efficient with resource utilisation; your company will have even greater control over IT spending than ever before.

It’s no wonder that BPO and Cloud go so well together since both offer agility, scalability, reliability and cost reduction.

Traditionally, the BPO service provider maintains a large data centre infrastructure with all the technology to run the customer’s business processes. However, if the service provider has his infrastructure in the cloud, it can make it available at a much lower cost. That can even open the possibility of offering business processes from day one, thanks to utilising shared platforms, applications and sometimes whole infrastructures to transform their customers’ business processes.

Cloud’s advantages

The greatest benefit is the coming of the virtual shared service centre. The virtual centre support staffs remain in their offices but work together online in a standardised way.

 

Cost reduction

  • Hosting standard applications. No need to host these applications individually, since cloud BPO providers host them for their clients.
  • Offload capital expenses and move to an operational expense model
  • Control over expenses and operational costs, providers offer most of these services as a pay-per-use.
  • Utilization. Providers are able to achieve a higher utilisation by balancing differing timeliness and work peaks.
  • Reduced need for a disaster recovery plan. Cloud connectivity is a built-in disaster recovery measure.

Standardised

BPO providers have optimised their processes. They also have access to the latest platforms and newest technology. Clients can access these at a much lower cost than if they had to develop them in-house.

Free up internal resources

Since they no longer have to maintain the infrastructure.

Potential risks and challenges

Data protection seems to be the biggest concern since sensitive corporate information is being hosted and accessed over the Web. Service providers must be able to assure their clients about their security practices. (employee background security checks, segregation of employee functions and sufficient encryption.)

Also, compliance with government regulations is a key concern.

 

If BPO providers will be able to solve these issues Cloud will be here to stay for good and will be the most often picked solution amongst customers and providers alike.

 

Reducing Costs While Maintaining Efficiency & Versatility

When operating a multilingual contact centre, customer service costs can add up fast, and over a short period of time they will quickly add up to A LOT.

If you are looking to improve your business’s bottom line, or provide better customer service, you need to implement these methods to reduce customer service costs without sacrificing the support part, and still providing exceptional customer experience.

Equipment

Re-evaluate your equip­ment, it could be cost­ing you more money than you think.  For example, automat­ing your contact centre’s tele­phone sys­tem for the less used cus­tomer ser­vice func­tions could potentially save time and reduce cost on pay­roll and train­ing. Cloud-based technology can also centralise your whole contact centre into one consolidated customer service centre.

  • Phone Sys­tem: Find an appropriate calling system that will streamline the process. An automated attendant or system that reroutes calls to correct contact centre agents quickly can be a life saver, especially during customer service peaks
  • Soft­ware: Is your CRM software integrated with your calling and scheduling systems? If not, make it your top priority.
  • Stor­age: Most on-site systems can be moved to the cloud, especially if they take up valuable space and resources. Evaluate if doing so will help you save on utility costs.

Multi-Channel

Embracing the multi-channel approach, implementing it and then aligning all your communication channels is what all contact centres should aim to achieve in 2015.

It’s not only about the technology, it’s about the people. Your contact centre is as strong as its core employees – the front line grunts, contact centre agents.

Make sure that your teams can handle multiple communication channels, be it email, phone call, live web chat or social media. Assigning two people per campaign to each communication channel might seem a reasonable choice, but in the end, it might cost you more.

Remember about attrition and turnover rates, which despite the efforts of contact centre managers still plague the industry to this day. Train each representative, they need to provide exceptional customer service on each communication channel – versatility is essential.

Also in the case of returning customers, if the same agent handles the quarry throughout all communication channels, it adds a new depth of personalisation thus creating a compelling experience for the customer resulting in increased customer satisfaction.

Cutting customer service costs is not about blindly “swingin’ the ole axe”  and reducing budgets, it’s about making your business more efficient.

Upgrading software, as well as hardware, will lead to increase in employee efficiency while embracing the multi-channel approach and centralising all communication channels will lead to increase in customer satisfaction, both of which will in the long-term lead to better customer retention.

Evaluate budgets, look for ways to increase efficiency, and only then cut costs.